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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
. one of my clarion -- four years ago i talked at clarion which is a wonderful science-fiction five week-long six weeklong boot camp and teachers come in and go a week and i did week 4 which i was told was when everybody cries and others break down. they did not have nervous breakdowns which was great. at one point, one of my guys -- can you tell whether your letters going to make it? and i said no. and some of us are brilliant and some of us -- how do you tell? no. ones who are going to make are the ones who write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant may have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in and they write every day and finish their stories and then write the next one they will make it. i saw him four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award and he said you know, it works. he didn't get the award but still very proud of him. my wife and i loved the audio versions and never worked. you are such a terrific voice actor. did you have those voices in mind as you were writing the book? i suppose i did but also ha
and it will be a financial boost for the city. >>> lawrence is out and about with the preview of the bay area science festival. what are you doing? >> oh, yeah. guys, i got to get this plane built. let me tell you, we're working on this really -- oh, i think i just bent the wing. [ laughter ] >> we'll have to do a little redo on that. but we're here enjoining the science festival at the tech museum of innovation. it's a great chance for you to bring the kids down. the whole family. there's something for everyone if you want to do it. it's taking place today and this weekend. so get down here and enjoy it if you want to do that. tell you what the weather is going to be great. we're looking at a lot of sunshine toward the afternoon. just a couple of high clouds drifting by. it's a little chilly in spots. some 40s and 50s. we are looking' patchy fog in the valleys so watch out for that. through the day, that should lift. high clouds will drift through but temperatures will be mild mainly in the 60s and 70s. but you know what? as we look toward the weekend that ridge really taking over. temperatures cou
is playing the science guy. i don't think you're ever coming back, lawrence. >> reporter: no. this is a lot of fun. a lot of kids can come down here and make some really interesting neat stuff. it's all part of a neat science festival they have at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to check it out. they have all kinds of things. this is what they are going to be using to launch some of those planes right here in the lobby and around the tech museum. they have exhibits, imax, real scientists that you can come down and meet and ask them very important questions too. the silicon valley really the center of what has been major innovations that really changed the world. you can come down and meet some of the scientists who have helped to make some of the changes. of course, the weather looking nice now. we are talking about some sunshine coming our way. we're going to need it this morning. it's chilly in spots, low 40s in the north bay valleys, 50s elsewhere, partly cloudy skies. we have a couple of patches of fog and high clouds likely to drift across our skies for today so
a science fiction five-week long, six-week long science-fiction boot camp. and i did week four, which is when everyone cries and has a nervous breakdown spirit and they did indeed do that. which was great. [laughter] at one point, one of my guys said how can you tell? can you tell which of us is going to make it. and i said no. he said, but some of us are brilliant, and can you tell? and i said no. the ones that are going to make it would be the ones that write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant have written brilliant stories and never write again, they are the ones who get in there and write everyday and finish their stories. then they write the next ones. and they will make it. i saw him about four months ago in arlington. he was nominated for a nebula award and he said, you know, it works. he didn't get the award, but still very proud of him. [laughter] my wife and i love this very much. thank you very much. i also like to cheat on the voices because of the ones i like are in the tv series. the ones i didn't like, i substituted the ones that were in my head. wh
in the science. the science of climate change does not consider the sun. the sun is very potent, a very potent aspect of our climate. that is the problem. the sun travels around the black hole in the center of the galaxy and it takes millions of years. each part of this journey has a different results. host: here's more images for you from the newspapers this morning on the aftermath of this storm. here is the new york post, freight in a storm for travelers shows a picture -- franenstorm. and here is the new york post with images of a fleet of the taxicabs sittings of march and a parking lot yesterday in hoboken, new jersey. and the front page of the new trailpost, frankenstorm's of ruin and despair. any despair in queens yesterday. in sacramento, calif., on our line for democrats, go ahead. . caller: i go back to a comment made by one of the candidates. this was an regard to a woman [indiscernible] i was wondering if the same person would think it is an act of god also. thank you. host: that was wesley in sacramento. let me give the political articles before we conclude here. this is the fron
structure. >> this eighth grade science teacher says increased class size and lack of funds to upgrade her cramped, 1950s era classroom, are effecting her ability to teach. >> i cram 32 students into this small classroom. so, when, i mean, can you imagine doing a lab in here? i have four chairs to one table. with such large class sizes, i am not able to spend as much time with each student. >> california's schools haven't always relied on the state for the bulk of their funding. until the 1970s, districts raised most of their money through property taxes and bonds. rich districts flourished. poor and minority districts struggled. such inequality was ruled illegal by the state supreme court. then, in 1978, voters passed proposition 13, which capped property taxes. >> before proposition 13, california schools received the largest share of their dollars from local property tax revenues. after proposition 13 passed, local property tax revenues in the state fell by over 50%. >> in response, voters passed prop 98 in 1988, which guaranteed a minimum funding level for k through 12 education. today
're talking about 11 fewer days to teach the math, science, reading and language arts that is really important for our students. >> i would say this is about the worse i've seen. or it will be if this doesn't pass. >> reporter: governor brown put proposition 30 on the ballot to raise $6 billion that has been allocated this year for csu budgets. it would also increase the state's sales tax. the tax increase would not apply to gasoline or food. >> no on proposition 30, thank you for voting. >> the funding isn't guaranteed to go to the schools. my biggist concern is giving everyone more money to the senators and assembly people up there and have it just spend it away before we raise taxes on anyone we need to get control of spending. we have a spending problem not a taxing problem. >> reporter: this week field polls showed that support the trended up. reporting live, jana katsuyama, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> the battle over proposition 37 on the labeling of genetically modified foods led to charges and denials today. a spoátar -- a supporter of the measure said that the fda had came up with the
question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bothered to vote. with four days to go, president obama and mitt romney made their closing arguments today at multiple stops in ohio and wisconsin. take a look at some of the sights and sounds from this day of campaigning. ♪ >> in this campaign he's tried as hard as he can to repackage, to repackage these same policies and offer them up as change. >> do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> giving more power back to the biggest banks, that's not change. >> and we need real change. >> anoth
their location, they have flood prep science, and their defenses work. it did not getss inside at all. safe than sorry. everything upstairs and prepared for the worse. luckily it did not happen like they predicted. just to give you a sense of where the flood waters came last night, you see the blue part of the fish market restaurant there? wherethe base of that is got to last night. folks say it was some of flooding they have in old almost a decade town, an area known for flooding. for most businesses, sandbags and other their job,ally did been a lotld have worse. said, there's a few more tides they are concerned especially one tomorrow morning the city officials are keeping a close eye on. the worst is over, seeing muchnot be flooding, but it is not a certain thing. e monitoringy will b closely until tomorrow night. will that, they feel they .e out of the woods for sure >> good deal. thanks. people in western maryland and virginia have a much different story on their hands. thousands of people because of these conditions you see here. virginia havewest seen nearly two feet of snow fall since mo
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
of college. >> status like this sophomore who is a computer science major. she is not surprised more members of percy across graduated. >> you have to get this and looking back, it seemed easy to the college work i do now. >> admissions officials say as more students graduate from high school, more of them are making plans for higher education. >> we see an increase in students applying each year but there are different pathways that students take. other students choose to start a community college. >> students are already looking beyond their college years. >> i plan to go to a 4 year college and i have a five-year plan when i graduate and get a job. >> you can see the statewide graduation drop out and testing day that at our website. >> coming up, new charges in the penn state sex abuse case, this time against the -- in-line >> with their colleagues a conspiracy of silence. >> >> live, local, late breaking-- this is wbal 11 news at 5:00. >> right now at 5:30, you are looking at a remarkable piece of time lapse a video of this scene in ocean city as super storm sandy moved through. this was
and i built a solar car that we raced across the united states. this is not rocket science, folks. this industry has been around a long time. it just requires political leadership. political leadership that my opponent is not willing to exercise. >> the political leadership came from the president of the united states. we both agree coal must be part of america's energy future. it is low cost, it is much cleaner than it was 30 years ago, and i am and all the above energy kind of gal. the energy costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. currently, solar energy is four or five times that much. if coal is the fuel of the past, reasonably priced electric bills are a thing of the past. i'm going to fight for those jobs and i will fight for low- cost energy. >> ok. that concludes the first half of our debate. we will take a 60-90 second non- commercial break and we'll be right back with you. thank you. [applause] >> we will go ahead and get the second part of the debate started. as i mentioned, the situation will be reversed in terms of the questioning. the first part of the second half of t
, more math and science teachers and all that stuff. but it's not exactly a huge agenda. so you are a voter. you are trying to imagine what is the next four years going to look like. i think it's very hard because the big questions have been unasked. >> woodruff: well, i guess only ten days to go after this. i was going to ask you about the ground game and all kinds of other things. but this has been better than that, better than the ground game. >> it's important for us to vent emotional. >> woodruff: mark shields, david brooks, thank you both. there is more politics talk with mark, david, and hari on the "doubleheader", recorded in our newsroom. that will be posted at the top of the rundown later tonight. >> brown: finally tonight, a woman is attacked and the life of her 13-year-old son, joe, is altered forever, along with his family. that's the dramatic outline of the new novel "the round house" by louise erdrich, which has been nominated for a national book award. the story is set on a native american reservation in north dakota, and it explores clashes of culture and law be
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. flavor, meet food. it's time for swanson flavor boost. concentrated broth in easy to use packets. mix it into skillet dishes, for an instant dose of... hell-o! [ female announcer ] get recipes at flavorboost.com. >> bret: the worst of the storm has passed in the northeast. now comes the clean-up. and the rebuild. all of that takes time. material and money. chief washington correspondent james rosen looks at the relief efforts. >> it's going to be a very large response to covering multiple states. the biggest thing i'm concerned about is the power outals. >> it's not home. but it's been made pretty comfortable for us. the national guard and the red cross here have been super. >> james and kimberly levine joined by the dogs were among the 650 delaware residents who took refuge monday night in seven shelters. the american red cross operates across the first state. this, the del mar station is special needs facility, offering not only a lively kennel, but emotional counselors,
. we don't even know how the satellite system works. we don't know a damn thing about science. put us in charge. to which i say hell, no! all right. now, when we come back, one of the guys who was in charge was michael brown. you remember brownie, heck of a job. he will be on the show. he's got a unique criticism of the president. he says that president obama reacted too fast to this storm. that should be a very interesting conversation when we come back. >> brownie you're doing a heck of a job. the fema director is working 24/7. [ applause ] >> cenk: we've got plenty more elbows for the last one came from. we have another one end at the of the show. try to guess this ononononononononononononononononononononononononononononononon >> cenk: we're getting our first look inside the tunnels under the east tunnels. the lirr. it has been flooded and as you can see it is a disaster area. literally. and how they even get the trains rolling again or how soon they will is, of course, very much an open question. and
-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure. deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bothered to vote. with four days to go president obama and mitt romney made their closing arguments today at multiple stops in ohio and wisconsin. take a look at some of the sights and sounds from this day of campaigning. ♪ >> in this campaign he's tried as hard as he can to repackage, to repackage these same policies and offer them up as change. >> do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> giving more power back to the biggest banks, that's not change. >> and we need real change. >> another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy, t
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
it to his fiial destinatiin wwlson pulled iito waikikk on t. thursday.the math and science teacher bbcame theefirst person to row and kite over the pacific, but there were &pbuums along the way. even moving wwthin the tradd variability that ssmetimes the kitessdidn'' work as well. so lots of rowing. rowing.wilson says his daily water supply was pumped straight from the oceann. and then purified on his boat. coming up... get whipped into of money on a gym memberrhip. traininn center you can get inno... for half price. you're watching fox 45 morninn ews.. all local.. all morning. 3 ,3&p((ad lib meteorologist)) 3 3 3 3 commng up... animations... that become a part of hiitory. history.the ell-known artist weekend.e in baltimore this immroving your workout thaa could pay dividends... ffr your health.you're watchiig fox 45 morning news.. all llcal.. all morning. ((break 6)) when we switched to fios, we got better tv, better phone, better internet. it was like somebody like took our computer, shook all the junk out of it. we're actually getting more for our money with fios. [ male announcer ]
and development money that comes from nih, the national science foundation. i would take issue with the fact that the republic of texas is making it all on their own they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i have no problem with that at all. ilt to benefit from the oriole history and such a profound way, we do not have that everywhere. but they do benefit from nasa and the national institute of health. and that is helped to spur their economy as well. host: a question on twitter -- why did obama not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions and the auto bailout. guest: that is an urban legend. we are working very hard to help the delphi unions and other unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw, iucwa to the development of the new general motors. but, this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as well as other unions had. so there are many salaried people, delphi salaried folks that say this is the president picking the unions over the
science save us? is it worth spending billions? george? >> it will, john. >>> the race for the white house now. it's "your voice, your vote" with just four days to go. both candidates going all-out. and the final question into this final weekend. will today's jobs report, the last one before election day, boost obama? or bolster romney's case on the economy? jake tapper is in ohio. good morning, jake. >> reporter: good morning from a barn outside columbus, george. the jobs report appears relatively good news, 171,000 jobs created in the month of october. and the previous two months had upward revisions of # 4,000. employment ticks up to 7.9% but only because of more people look for work, this jobs report comes as this election comes down to the wire. stumping for votes, the candidates leave no stone unturned. as they make their closing arguments. in virginia, neck and neck and romney was heckled. >> what about the climate? that's what caused the storm. >> reporter: he did some heckling of his own against the president. >> the president said he was going to consider putting in place a secre
happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ dig if you will the picture of you and -- >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ -- engaged in a kiss ♪ ♪ the sweat of your body covers me can you my darling, can you picture this ♪ >> stephanie: um um um. it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. fifty minutes after the hour. remember i told you guys a while ago i was invited to a delightful dinner party with a lot of pictures of kate walsh in it. and i was like wow. somebody has a lot of pictures of kate walsh. turned out it was kate walsh's house. we trashed the place. good morning kate walsh. >> good morning. >> stephanie: i was like somebody is really stalking kate walsh in the house. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: no, i know your business partner, so it was great to finally meet you. i have been a fan forever. i saw the picture of you with obama, and i'm like now i love you even more. >> yeah that's right. >> stephanie: you are introducing the president tomorrow in a campaign event in iowa? >> yeah, we're going to d
view, not science, just your gut, are we living in a time unlike times of the past? >> the simple answer is absolutely. i've never seen anything like this. i mean, we're having an annual storm of the century. it is just crazy. >> i spoke with an official at the electric powers research institute. he said building a power grid that could withstand these kinds of storms is just not economically feasible. so how best to deal with these changes remains to be seen. >> go back to those numbers for a second. he predicted a surge of 11 1/2 feet. >> which would have been the highest ever, it was closer to 14. and there's a piece in the paper trying to figure out is it climate change what's going on? the temperature in the western atlantic, 5 degrees above normal for the end of october. there's something going on. >> harry smith. and by the way, harry's going to have more on a special "rock center with brian williams" tonight 10:00/9:00 central right here on nbc. >>> let's get a check of the weather now from al. >> thanks a lot, matt. a show of hands, who has been stuck in new york? where a
that comes from nih -- the national science foundation. i would take issue that the republic of texas is making it on their own. they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development sollars, which is fine. -- development dollars, which is fine. the benefit from the oil industry is a unique situation. we do not have that everywhere. texas' benefit from nasa, the national science foundation investment, and the national institutes of health. >> congressman gary wants me to ask you why obama did not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions in the auto bailout. >> that is an urban legend. we are working to help the unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw and others. but this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as other unions. there are many salaried folks who are saying this was the president picking the unions over the salary people. that is not true. there are other unions that did not make out -- it was a bankruptcy. it was a difficult decision. it is not true.
it said redaction is then made. and we often found that this was not a science. someone said this morning, it was a mathematical. it is hard. and you will have people disagree even within the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. we would get very significant reductions. give it to another person, much less significant, and it would argue with each other as to what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply with a broad stroke redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why it would harm the national security which is the standard. by pushing back the information in the public that it turned out to be was not able to be released and give the public and insight on what was happening within the agency. inside having access and permission we have the ability and roll that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government because you know what is happening within the agency. you know where the bodies are buried. you know how th
of marriage. it is not what got a design. and that is what we focus on is using the social science. what that shows is what society for centuries has followed in the judeo-christian teaching is actually right. if you want to have a successful happy prosperous relationship and the family and marriage, you preserve yourself until marriage, you abstain from sexual relations, you enjoy that married relationship, you produce children, you raise them in that environment where they are loving and there's a commitment between the mother and the father. and expose them to the religious teachings. in the evidence is overwhelming. a better emotionally, educationally, economically. i understand, that is not, everybody has not had that opportunity. and we need to reach an as a community, in particular reaching out and helping those that do not have that benefit. we should never take our policies and change them away from what we should be aspiring to be. and the best environment for a child, bar none, is with their biological mother and father who are in a lifelong marriage relationship, those childr
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ sxz all right. my story of the week. what if ohio were the bronx. ohio likely voters taken from tuesday through thursday show president obama with a slight lead over romney. the reason pollsters are obsessively polling ohio and political reporters flooded the state and barack obama and romney have been living there is because it's most likely the state to win the election. if romney wins florida, virginia and colorado, it's still difficult for him to get to the needed 270 electoral votes without winning ohio. there's one lone point of comfort as the polls tightened to a tie or a slight lead for romney. in ohio, polls reliablely show romney two to five points behind the president. political observers spent a fair amount of time why barack obama is outperforming his national numbers in ohio, among white men. the ohio economy is outperforming the national economy. ohio has a lower unemployment rate than the nation at large, it's seen a faster rate of improvement. a big reason for that is, of course, the auto re
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)